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Archive for March, 2013

March 12, 2013

Grow Your Own Replacement Tooth?

March 12, 2013 — Growing a replacement tooth from your own cells may be a step closer, according to new research.

It is still too early for use in people, but the technique involves taking stem cells and growing more of them to produce a very small, immature tooth, similar to what a tooth would look like when it starts to grow in an embryo.

“It’s very immature and very small,” says Paul Sharpe, the Dickinson professor of craniofacial biology at King’s College, London, who led the work. “These are transplanted directly into the mouth where they get their blood supply, and they start to grow and gradually form a complete tooth.”

Although the technique is unlikely to allow scientists to grow a specific type of tooth, dentists would be able to shape the tooth crown according to its position in the jaw.

Hybrid Human Teeth in Mic

Sharpe’s team from the Dental Institute at King’s College combined human gum cells with the cells in mice responsible for growing teeth. They transplanted this combination of cells into the mice. The result was hybrid human/mouse teeth with roots.

The ability to make a tooth replacement with roots would be a major step forward in dental surgery. Replacing missing or damaged teeth currently involves fixed or removable dental implants.

Putting Down Roots

Although implants work well, the impact from chewing can wear down the implant. This is not a problem with natural teeth because they have soft tissue at the root that acts as a shock absorber.

The latest advance made by Sharpe and his team brings the prospect of bio-engineered teeth with their own root system a step closer. The next step will be finding enough adult sources of human cells to make this new technique a viable alternative to dental implants.

The study appears in the Journal of Dental Research.


March 24, 2013

Beavercreek Girl Scouts Receive Highest Award

Eleven area Girl Scouts recently received the Gold Award, the organization’s highest award.

Those receiving the award included Kaitlyn Apple and Megan Woolf of Xenia; Rachel Barnes and Leah Simon of Bellbrook; Diana Harvey and Lauren Saxe of Beavercreek; Barbara Kiddon, Jasmine French, and Caroline Tinsley of Fairborn; Kaitlyn Lare of Yellow Springs; and Christine Stapleton of Centerville.girl-scout-photos


March 26, 2013

Welcome Back Becky!

Our longtime receptionist, Becky, is back after an extended leave.  We are grateful to have her smiling face back greeting and assisting patients.  Thanks to everyone for their well wishes!


March 27, 2013

Fact or Fiction – Top 10 Dental Health Symptoms

If your mouth or jaw hurt, it could be from a toothache. Toothaches usually indicate a cavity but they can also signal gum disease. In some cases, a toothache is a sign of an abscess or impacted tooth. A toothache should be evaluated by a dentist right away to determine the cause of the problem and prevent the tooth from dying.  Watch the ADA Slideshow

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March 6, 2013

Happy Birthday Patsy

Indian Ripple Dental would like to wish Patsy, one of our Dental Hygienists, a very Happy Birthday!  Appropriately name, Patsy’s birthday is on Saint Patrick’s Day!


March 5, 2013

Take Good Care of your Dentures

It’s important to take good care of dentures and keep them clean, just like you would your natural teeth.

 The American Dental Association offers these suggestions:

  • Brush dentures every day.
  • Before brushing, rinse dentures to remove debris and food particles.
  • Thoroughly brush all areas of your mouth, including your tongue, inside the cheeks, gums and the roof of the mouth.
  • When storing your dentures, make sure they’re soaking in water, completely covered, and in a safe spot.
  • If you use an adhesive, follow instructions carefully.

March 6, 2013

1 in 8 Adults May Have Sensitive Teeth

A new survey of U.S. dental offices finds that one in eight people has over-sensitive teeth.

If you sometimes get a jolt of pain in your mouth when you drink or eat something hot or cold, you’re not alone.  Sensitive teeth were most common in young adults, women and people who had receding gums or did at-home tooth whitening. “The condition is impacting people’s lives, and they may avoid some foods,” said Dr. Joana Cunha-Cruz, a research assistant professor at the University of Washington and lead study author. Cold, hot, sweet and acidic foods and drinks often trigger the pain. “But it’s not like they are feeling pain all the time,” Cunha-Cruz added.

Teeth might be sensitive for a few weeks and then fine for a few weeks. Sensitive teeth often occurs when enamel on the outside of the tooth, or the tissue between the tooth and gum called cementum, wears away, exposing small tubes that connect nerves inside the tooth to triggers outside of the tooth, Cunha-Cruz said.

The current study included 37 general dental practices in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Utah. A total of 787 adults were surveyed. The results appear in the March issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association. Dentists in the study asked their patients if they had recently been bothered by pain, sensitivity or discomfort in their teeth or gums. Then the dentists examined the patients to make sure their pain was not due to another problem, such as a cavity, chipped tooth or swollen gums. About 12 percent of patients had pain or sensitivity that was not related to another problem, and thus were diagnosed as having sensitive teeth. Knowing the prevalence “gives dentists an idea of how much to look for this problem in their practice,” Cunha-Cruz said. Previous studies have reported that anywhere from 1 percent to 52 percent of patients at general dental practices have sensitive teeth. The wide range could be due to differences in how people in the studies were screened, the authors noted. Some studies asked people directly about sensitive teeth, whereas others asked about specific consequences such as problems drinking cold water. “It’s hard to generalize, but probably for people that are visiting the general dentist, one in eight have sensitive teeth that is bothering them,” Cunha-Cruz said. However, study participants were predominantly white, nearly 82 percent, so it remains possible that teeth sensitivity could be more or less common in other racial groups, she added. Another dental expert talked about vulnerability to the condition. “Teeth sensitivity is universal, but some people and cultures could be more at risk depending on their diet, if it is very acidic, and if they drink a lot of wine or alcohol,” said Dr. Richard Trushkowsky, associate director of International Aesthetic Dentistry at New York University. He was not involved with the study.

The researchers found that adults between 18 and 44 were 3.5 times more likely than older adults to have sensitive teeth, possibly because the material inside the tooth called dentin gets thicker over time, providing more insulation, said Marilynn Rothen, a study co-author and lead regional coordinator for the network of dental practices in the study, called Northwest Practice-based Research Collaborative in Evidence-based Dentistry.

Women were 1.8 times more likely than men to have the condition, the study also found. However, it is not clear if women are more likely to have sensitive teeth or if they are just more willing to report pain, Cunha-Cruz said. Additional risk factors for sensitive teeth in the study were having receding gums, which can expose the tubes in the inside of the tooth like loss of enamel can, and performing at-home tooth whitening. By Carina Storrs HealthDay Reporter