Call today to make and appointment!

937-427-1749

Archive for July, 2013

July 26, 2013

Athlete of the Week – Beavercreek

Beavercreek High School Track “Athlete of the Week” is Dekan Ekpo, age 17.  Claim to Fame: GWOC and district 100 champ, state placer.  Congratulations!dekanekpo


July 24, 2013

Congrats to the Beavercreek Dance Team!

BEAVERCREEK — The Elite Team from Beavercreek Dance Team recently competed in the NEXSTAR National Dance Competition in Sandusky, Ohio. The team brought home first place in their division out of 18 teams and then qualified for the “Big Show” where they brought home second place.

The team is comprised of eight girls representing Juniorettes and Beaverettes. Members include: Bri Ferguson, Ally Sparks, Lindsay Warwick, Megan Sheets, Jessica Santalucia, Kierra Santalucia, Jenna Luthman and Taylor Smith.

The team is coached by: Jessica Stricker, Robin Ferguson and Lindsay Austin. Their routine, “Man Like That”, choreographed by Miss Stricker also brought home the Performance Award at Nationals.

The Elite Team is a successful new addition to Beavercreek Dance Teams, Tinys, Minis, Creekettes, Juniorettes and Beaverettes.176443a


August 12, 2013

When Heat & Cold Hurt Your Teeth

Perhaps you’ve taken a swig of a cold drink and winced in pain. Or inhaled on a chilly day and felt a jolt when the air hit your teeth. Maybe you found yourself unable to enjoy a cup of hot tea without a sharp ache punctuating each sip. If any of these situations sounds familiar, you probably have sensitive teeth.

The reasons for the discomfort are many, says Mark S. Wolff, DDS, PhD, a professor and chair of the Department of Cariology and Comprehensive Care at New York University College of Dentistry. First, the root structure of one or more teeth may have become exposed. Normally covered by gum tissue, this layer just underneath — called dentin — contains millions of tiny tubules (or tubes), each of which is connected to a nerve ending. It’s when the tubules are left unprotected by gum recession or enamel erosion that problems arise. Receding gums, tooth grinding, a diet high in acidic beverages, and overaggressive brushing can all leave dentin exposed.

Tooth Enamel Erosion and Restoration

Enamel is the thin outer covering of the tooth. This tough shell is the hardest tissue in the human body. Enamel covers the crown which is the part of the tooth that?s visible outside of the gums. Because enamel is translucent, you can see light through it. But the main portion of the tooth, the dentin, is the part that?s responsible for your tooth color — whether white, off white, grey, or yellowish. Sometimes coffee, tea, cola, red wine, fruit juices, and cigarettes stain the enamel on your…

Brushing too hard is a surprisingly big problem for a lot of people, Wolff says. “Harsh strokes wear away at the gum tissue as well as the tooth’s enamel layer, leaving each dentin tubule vulnerable to whatever it comes in contact with — hot, cold, soft, or hard.”

Your favorite beverages can make a big difference, too. Anything with a high acid level — sodas, coffee, tea, almost all juices, wine, and many popular energy drinks — can worsen enamel erosion and discomfort. Carbonated water is OK, says Wolff, but watch out for flavored seltzer, which may have citric acid.

Dentin can also become irritated if you overuse tooth-whitening agents, which contain harsh ingredients to strip away stains. Unfortunately, they can also thin the enamel layer around dentin, exposing the tender tubules.

For severe sensitivity, talk to your dentist about bonding the problematic areas. This is essentially a very fine varnish your dentist applies to the tooth. It’s not a permanent fix, though.

Courtesy of WebMD


July 23, 2013

Eat & Drink Your Way to a Brighter, Healthier Smile!

Stars like Jessica Alba and Scarlett Johansson need killer smiles for their livelihood, but for us mere mortals, a whiter, brighter smile can do wonders for our appearance and self-confidence. Plus, surveys reveal that one of the first things that people notice about others is their smile, and as that old saw goes, you only get one chance to make a first impression.

Dr. Timothy Chase, a 15-year veteran of cosmetic dentistry in New York City says white teeth and healthy gums can take 10 years off your appearance. And while professional dental products work best for whitening, what you eat and don’t eat can play a huge role in how white your teeth are. It seems certain fruits, vegetables and other foods can aid in your quest for whiter teeth. Here’s what you should know about the white smile diet:

The crunch factor

Apples, cauliflower, celery and carrots work to whiten because they function as an abrasive scrub for teeth. These foods are nature’s toothbrush. They also stimulate the production of saliva, which helps keep plaque from forming. Stain sticks to plaque.

Orange ya glad?

The acid in oranges and pineapples may whiten and brighten the surface of the teeth. The acid also contains enzymes that kill bacteria that cause tooth decay and bad breath. “Saliva is the body’s wonder fluid,” says Chase, and eating juicy citrus increases saliva production that washes away foods that stain like coffee, soda and red wine.

Strawberry patch

Strawberries contain an enzyme called malic acid that can whiten teeth. Munch berries several times a week to naturally whiten chompers.

Pass the cheese, please

Dairy products such as yogurt, milk and hard cheeses like cheddar contain lactic acid, which may help protect teeth against decay. Researchers think proteins in yogurt may bind to teeth and prevent them from attack by harmful acids that cause cavities. Dairy is also loaded with calcium, which guards and strengthens bone that holds teeth in place. Plus, chewing hard cheese creates saliva that helps remove food particles that stain.

You can also try to avoid stain-causing foods. Any food that causes a stubborn laundry stain can discolor teeth, too. If you look at a tooth under a microscope, it looks like a kitchen sponge with many little nooks, crannies and holes. When stain-causing foods and beverages get stuck in those nooks and crannies, especially over time, dark stains develop. While we hear a lot about coffee, tea and red wine, soda is actually one of the worst offenders. It not only contains acids that open up those nooks but then stains them with cola color.

While you’re at it, be sure to go easy on other teeth-staining food and drink, such as coffee, tea, blueberries, red wine, soy sauce and tobacco.

“It only takes seven minutes for destruction to start, but you can stop it by rinsing with plain water for seven seconds until you can brush and remove plaque,” says Dr. Joe Kravitz, a Washington D.C. dentist and author of “Dirty Mouth.” If you can’t get to a toothbrush or drink water, chew sugarless gum to remove stain food causing particles.