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September 3, 2014

Red Wine may not be so Good for Oral Health

Dentistry Today Magazine — Red wine may be good for your overall health but not so much for you oral health.

The acidity of red wine leaves a mark on your teeth and over time that takes its toll. A survey released recently showed that only 16 percent of people are concerned with oral health implications when drinking alcohol. This is a problem based on the fact that many alcoholic drinks are filled with sugar and possess high acidity levels.

Acidic drinks attack enamel, making teeth more susceptible to bacteria. Sparkling wines or Champagne are the worst offenders of attacking teeth, which is why it’s better to drink a flat drink than a fizzy drink based on lesser carbonation.

Acidic drinks are a major problem for teeth during the summer, when people are more likely to drink acidic fruit punches or attend celebrations where they will drink Champagne. Drinking water between drinks may help to curb the adverse effects of acidic alcoholic drinks.

There are many drinks—in addition to red wine or port—that stain teeth. Coffee-based cocktails or spirits mixed with dark juices also have the same negative impact on teeth. It’s essential to brush thoroughly after consuming these beverages when enough time has passed, preventing brushing from doing more harm than good.0814_wine_r1